Ocean Champions is the only political voice for ocean health. We take a non-partisan approach in working with
the U.S. Congress to ensure ocean health through electoral and legislative action.

Call Me Fishmeal

Posted by: Mike Mishler

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First of all, Yay! Go Obama, and go Ocean Champions.

Now back to our regularly scheduled program.

Not too long ago I was in our local grocery store looking for something to make for dinner. I wanted to grill hamburgers, but this little old guy cut me off and then just stood there staring down at the various cuts of meat like he was waiting for a message from above. I waited, trying to be polite, and still he just stood there. After a few minutes I decided we’d have fish for dinner. Wandering over to the seafood counter I was already planning for a nice salmon, but all I found were fish with . Apparently, farm fish need to have color added to make them look like what we think salmon should look like. Hmm, maybe if I grill them with a nice Coppertone and basil marinade.

As I’m standing in front of the fish counter I start thinking about A Seafood Snob Ponders the Future of Fish an article I read in the New York Times. The author, Mark Bittman writes that by mid-century, depleted stocks of wild fish might mean we’ll all be eating farm fish unless we make an effort to preserve our fisheries and as Bittman puts it “broaden our appetites” by learning to like things like mackerel and other . . . Wait a minute, the cat appears to have a problem with that.
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The thing is we are already moving on to the fish that used to be considered “trash” fish. My sister-in-law laughs whenever she sees tilapia on restaurant menus because in the Philippines that was considered poor people food.

Bittman notes that scientists think there may still be time to prevent, or at last slow down a fisheries collapse but it will take more than not eating the big fish. It also means changing what we do with the smaller fish like “herring, mackerel, anchovies and sardines.” that big fish eat. Right now aquaculture and agriculture are the biggest consumers of smaller fish turning them into fishmeal used to feed pigs, cows, and farmed fish. Of course this is less than efficient. According to Bittman it takes an average of 3 kilograms of forage fish to produce 1 kilogram of farmed salmon.

So as I’m standing there thinking about big fish eating little fish, choosing farmed or wild salmon, and why the heck cows are eating fishmeal, (That might explain the way leather jackets smell) when I hear a cough behind me.

“Hey buddy, you gonna stand there all day?”

It’s the old man. Apparently the voices told him to go with fish instead of beef.

Date Posted: November 24, 2008 @ 12:29 am

2 Comments »

  1. And all this time I thought it was a Dog-Eat-Dog world when if fact it is a Cow-Eat-Fish arena…

    Comment by maxine — November 24, 2008 @ 8:17 pm
  2. Nice post u have here Added to my RSS reader

    Comment by RYErnest — November 29, 2008 @ 4:16 am

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Ocean Champions is the only political voice for ocean health. We take a non-partisan approach in working with the U.S. Congress to ensure ocean health through electoral and legislative action.

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